TITLE

SUNRISE 2005—LESS THAN 10 MONTHS … AND COUNTING

AUTHOR(S)
Rossi, John
PUB. DATE
April 2004
SOURCE
Hospitality Upgrade;Spring2004, p122
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports on the need for North American companies to be able to scan a variety of bar code labels such as EAn-13, UPC-12 and EAN-8 by January 1, 2005, in line with Sunrise 2005 compliance provided by the Uniform Council Code. Manufacturers' modification of their labeling to coincide with the global standard of a 13-digit schema; Issues that will determine if the company is vulnerable to problems by not being at least Sunrise 2005 compliant.
ACCESSION #
12847852

 

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