TITLE

New CIPD evidence proves front line leaders make the difference between low-performing and high-performing firms

PUB. DATE
March 2004
SOURCE
Management Services;Mar2004, Vol. 48 Issue 3, p6
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The research launched by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) in Great Britain in December 2003 proves categorically that front line manager (FLM) behaviour is a critical factor in developing organisational commitment. The higher the employees rated their FLM in terms of the way they managed people, the more satisfied and committed they were. The research argues that it is the way policies are implemented that makes the critical difference. The authors of the report call this organisation process advantage and this is about how FLM carry out tasks such as performance appraisal, coaching and development, involvement and communication, absence management and discipline and grievances. All companies included in the study showed a significant correlation between relationship with FLM and employee attitude. CIPD offers several recommendations concerning the study. FLM need a good working relationship with their own managers. This was the most important factor influencing their own levels of commitment to the organisation. FLM also need time to carry out their people management roles as there is a tendency for these to be driven out in favor of other duties. FLM also need to be carefully selected with more attention paid to behaviour competencies such as communication and emotional intelligence.
ACCESSION #
12802181

 

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