TITLE

THE NEW PURITANISM

AUTHOR(S)
Gillin, Eric; Lindsay, Greg
PUB. DATE
April 2004
SOURCE
Advertising Age;4/5/2004, Vol. 75 Issue 14, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses issues facing marketers in the U.S. as of April 2004. Overview of the surprise guest appearance of Janet Jackson's right breast at the Super Bowl; Possible result if media vehicles and audience continue to fragment; Series of events which underscores a need for mainstream audiences to be protected; Indecency issue tackled by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission.
ACCESSION #
12790826

 

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