TITLE

Host nest site choice depends on risk of cuckoo parasitism in magpie hosts

AUTHOR(S)
Expósito-Granados, Mónica; Parejo, Deseada; Martínez, Juan Gabriel; Precioso, Marta; Molina-Morales, Mercedes; Avilés, Jesús M.
PUB. DATE
November 2017
SOURCE
Behavioral Ecology;Nov/Dec2017, Vol. 28 Issue 6, p1492
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Avian brood parasites impose large fitness costs on their hosts and, thus, brood parasitism has selected for an array of host defensive mechanisms to avoid them. So far most studies have focused on antiparasite defenses operating at the egg and chick stages and neglected defenses that may work prior to parasite egg deposition. Here, we experimentally explore the possibility that hosts, as part of a front-line defense, might minimize parasitism costs through informed nest site choice based on perceived risk of cuckoo parasitism. We conducted a large-scale manipulation of visual and auditory cues potentially informing on the risk of great spotted cuckoo Clamator glandarius parasitism during the nest site choice period of the magpie Pica pica host to investigate its effect on host's nest settlement and individual year to year site fidelity. Early breeding magpies preferentially placed their nests in safe areas (i.e., in sites of low perceived risk of parasitism), and, this effect diluted with time elapsed since risk of parasitism was manipulated. Site fidelity of individual magpies decreased with risk of cuckoo parasitism, for those that were not parasitized in the previous year. Our results constitute the first strong evidence showing that hosts can minimize the costs of cuckoo parasitism through informed nest-site choice, calling for future consideration of defenses potentially operating prior to parasite egg deposition to achieve a better understanding of cuckoo-host coevolution.
ACCESSION #
126283448

 

Related Articles

  • Eavesdropping cuckoos: further insights on great spotted cuckoo preference by magpie nests and egg colour. Soler, Juan; Avilés, Jesús; Martín-Gálvez, David; Neve, Liesbeth; Soler, Manuel // Oecologia;May2014, Vol. 175 Issue 1, p105 

    Reproductive success of brood parasites largely depends on appropriate host selection and, although the use of inadvertent social information emitted by hosts may be of selective advantage for cuckoos, this possibility has rarely been experimentally tested. Here, we manipulated nest size and...

  • Learned recognition of brood parasitic cuckoos in the superb fairy-wren Malurus cyaneus. Langmore, N. E.; Feeney, W. E.; Crowe-Riddell, J.; Luan, H.; Louwrens, K. M.; Cockburn, A. // Behavioral Ecology;Jul/Aug2012, Vol. 23 Issue 4, p798 

    Cuckoo hosts defend themselves against parasitism by means of mobbing, egg rejection, and chick rejection. However, each of these defenses is prone to costly recognition errors, and hosts are therefore more likely to deploy these defenses if they observe a cuckoo in the vicinity of their nest....

  • Climate change and coevolution in the cuckoo-reed warbler system. Berkowic, Daniel; Stokke, Bård; Meiri, Shai; Markman, Shai // Evolutionary Ecology;Jul2015, Vol. 29 Issue 4, p581 

    The evolution of traits in hosts may be influenced by their parasites and vice versa and a coevolutionary arms race often develops between the two. As part of such an arms race, the common cuckoo mimics the eggs of its hosts to avoid egg rejection. Traits related to this arms race may also be...

  • UNDERSTANDING NEST SUCCESS AND BROOD PARASITISM IN THE ENDANGERED BLACK-CAPPED VIREO: COMPARISONS WITH TWO SYMPATRIC SONGBIRDS. CAMPOMIZZI, ANDREW J.; MATHEWSON, HEATHER A.; MORRISON, MICHAEL L.; LITUMA, CHRISTOPHER M.; CONKLING, TARA J.; COCIMANO, M. CONSTANZA; FARRELL, SHANNON L.; WILKINS, R. NEAL; BUTCHER, JERROD A. // Wilson Journal of Ornithology;Dec2013, Vol. 125 Issue 4, p709 

    Nest prédation and brood parasitism likely cause declines in many songbird species, yet the rate of these declines varies among species. Simultaneously studying co-occurring species with overlapping territories provides an opportunity to identify differences among the species that may explain...

  • Shiny cowbirds share foster mothers but not true mothers in multiply parasitized mockingbird nests. Gloag, Ros; Fiorini, Vanina; Reboreda, Juan; Kacelnik, Alex // Behavioral Ecology & Sociobiology;Apr2014, Vol. 68 Issue 4, p681 

    Obligate brood parasitic birds, such as cowbirds, evade parental care duties by laying their eggs in the nests of other species. Cowbirds are assumed to avoid laying repeatedly in the same nest so as to prevent intrabrood competition between their offspring. However, because searching for host...

  • Spectral tuning and perceptual differences do not explain the rejection of brood parasitic eggs by American robins ( Turdus migratorius). Croston, Rebecca; Hauber, Mark // Behavioral Ecology & Sociobiology;Mar2014, Vol. 68 Issue 3, p351 

    By laying their eggs in the nests of other birds, avian brood parasites impose the cost of rearing young upon their hosts. The recognition and rejection of foreign eggs are primary host defenses against costly brood parasitism. Hosts of parasitic brown-headed cowbirds ( Molothrus ater) challenge...

  • Brood parasitism and quasi-parasitism in the European barn swallow Hirundo rustica rustica. Petrželková, Adéla; Michálková, Romana; Albrechtová, Jana; Cepák, Jaroslav; Honza, Marcel; Kreisinger, Jakub; Munclinger, Pavel; Soudková, Martina; Tomášek, Oldřich; Albrecht, Tomáš // Behavioral Ecology & Sociobiology;Sep2015, Vol. 69 Issue 9, p1405 

    We studied patterns of extra-pair maternity (EPM) in 245 nests (225 nests belonging to 120 females of known identity) of sexually promiscuous European barn swallows ( Hirundo rustica rustica) over a 3-year period. At least one EPM nestling was identified in 54 nests (22.0 %), representing 5.7 %...

  • Experimental shifts in egg-nest contrasts do not alter egg rejection responses in an avian host-brood parasite system. Hauber, Mark; Aidala, Zachary; Igic, Branislav; Shawkey, Matthew; Moskát, Csaba // Animal Cognition;Sep2015, Vol. 18 Issue 5, p1133 

    Obligate brood parasitic birds exploit their hosts to provide care for unrelated young in the nest. Potential hosts can reduce the cost of parasitism by rejecting foreign eggs from the nest. Observational, comparative, and experimental studies have concluded that most hosts use the coloration...

  • Who moved my eggs? An experimental test of the egg arrangement hypothesis for the rejection of brood parasitic eggs. Hanley, Daniel; Samaš, Peter; Hauber, Mark; Grim, Tomáš // Animal Cognition;Jan2015, Vol. 18 Issue 1, p299 

    Avian brood parasitism is an exceptional reproductive strategy whereby parasites reduce their own costs associated with parental care and impose them on the host parents. Consequently, host species have evolved multiple defensive mechanisms to combat parasitism. The vast majority of research...

  • Is egg-damaging behavior by great spotted cuckoos an accident or an adaptation? Manuel Soler; Juan G. Martínez // Behavioral Ecology;Sep2000, Vol. 11 Issue 5, p495 

    Adult great spotted cuckoos Clamator glandarius damage the eggs of their magpie Pica pica host without removing them from the nest or eating them but by producing the death of the embryo. Observations as well as experiments were used to test several predictions of two different ...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics