TITLE

SHORT-TERM EXTERNAL EFFECTS OF INCREMENT CORING ON SOME TROPICAL TREES

AUTHOR(S)
Neo, L.; Chong, K. Y.; Koh, C. Y.; Tan, S. Y.; Loh, J. W.; Lim, R. C. J.; Seah, W. W.; Tan, H. T. W.
PUB. DATE
October 2017
SOURCE
Journal of Tropical Forest Science;2017, Vol. 29 Issue 4, p519
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The invasive technique of increment coring may be unavoidable in forest ecology research requiring data on wood traits. Despite this, no study has examined the effects of increment coring on tropical forest trees. We cored 35 trees of 11 species from nine families, with wood densities ranging from 0.30 to 0.69 g cm-3, at two sites in Singapore. Tree survival, borehole closure and external signs of damage resulting directly from the coring were monitored for 1 year. Tree radial growth was estimated from changes in diameter at breast height. Of the cored trees, only one died after 1 year. Twenty-five out of the 35 trees had at least one closed borehole and the median time to closure was 10 months. The species of tree cored was the only significant predictor of borehole closure. We observed three main categories of external damage: discoloured bark, surface wounds and the presence of fungal fruiting bodies or insects within the boreholes. Changes in the trunk diameter were not significantly different between cored and uncored trees. Our results suggest that increment coring in the tropics does not negatively impact the survival and growth of some species of tropical forest trees within the first year after coring.
ACCESSION #
126272667

 

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