TITLE

Oppo Research

AUTHOR(S)
Zacharia, Janine
PUB. DATE
March 2004
SOURCE
New Republic;3/22/2004, Vol. 230 Issue 10, p12
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
At the 2004 Summit of the Americas in Mexico, a gathering of nearly every nation in North and South America, United States President George W. Bush took his push for democratization to the United States' backyard. In several countries, the United States has tilted the political playing field against flawed but democratically elected left-wing leaders. Working through government-linked organizations, Washington has funneled money to opponents of former Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide and Latin American presidents, promoting opposition politicians rather than democracy itself. James Dobbins, the Clinton administration special envoy to Haiti from 1994 to 1996, says there is no evidence the United States forcibly removed Aristide. In recent months, Roger Noriega, now assistant secretary of state for Western Hemisphere affairs, and the man responsible for the administration's Haiti policy, has worked closely with National Security Council Latin America envoy Otto Reich, who also has strongly denounced Aristide and leftist leaders in Latin America, and who had contacts with some of the opposition forces who tried to overthrow Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez two years ago. The Bush administration has exerted its influence in Haiti by pumping cash into programs that empower political opposition groups while withholding aid for the Aristide government. The White House did little to tamp down the violent anti-Aristide rebellion once it began.
ACCESSION #
12515484

 

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