TITLE

Rival firms in a deal to tackle Aussie market

PUB. DATE
March 2004
SOURCE
IT Training;Mar2004, p15
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Australian e-learning company Impart Technology is to take over the local operations of U.S. rival Docent Inc. in an exclusive partnership deal designed to crack the market down under. The deal includes exclusive distribution rights for Docent's range of enterprise e-learning software. Impart, which has previously focused on developing e-learning content, plans to expand into systems and services, playing on the strength of Docent in the learning applications market. Impart's clients include federal government agencies.
ACCESSION #
12511151

 

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