TITLE

IT'LL NEVER FLY QUORN

PUB. DATE
March 2004
SOURCE
Management Today;Mar2004, p14
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Quorn, the edible fungus loved by vegetarians but likened by foodies to cardboard, has become the unlikely hero of the meat-free world. Dismissed by the uninitiated as a poor meat substitute, Quorn is the leading brand in Great Britain's vegetarian market. The first mycoprotein-containing pie was test-marketed by Sainsbury PLC's in 1985, and its creator, Marlow Foods Ltd., now owned by Montagu Private Equity, launched the Quorn brand name the following year. More than two decades of tests later, the food is fit for human consumption and the vegetarian revolution was under way.
ACCESSION #
12510827

 

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