TITLE

Caveat emptor: direct-to-consumer supply and advertising of genetic testing

AUTHOR(S)
Mykitiuk, Roxanne
PUB. DATE
February 2004
SOURCE
Clinical & Investigative Medicine;Feb2004, Vol. 27 Issue 1, p23
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Provides information on direct-to-consumer (DTC) supply and advertising of genetic testing. Access to commercial testing services for genetic susceptibility; Arguments in favor of DTC of genetic testing; Example of DTC marketing of genetic susceptibility.
ACCESSION #
12485532

 

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