TITLE

FEAR FACTOR

AUTHOR(S)
Wehrfritz, George; Culpan, Tim
PUB. DATE
March 2004
SOURCE
Newsweek (Pacific Edition);3/8/2004 (Pacific Edition), Vol. 143 Issue 10, p24
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The island's election is still anybody's race. But for the once-dominant KMT, the stakes couldn't be higher. The Kuomintang's message in Taiwan's upcoming presidential election is more cautionary than inspirational. A vote for the once-dominant party, dramatically tossed from power just four years ago, is a vote for economic growth, steady-handed governance and improved relations with China--or so goes the pitch. Pending corruption cases, fading dreams of Chinese unity, the rise of a rebel generation within its rank and file and the virtual collapse of the party's business empire all bode ill should its chairman, 68-year-old Lien Chan, fail to dislodge DPP President Chen Shui-bian when the ballots are counted on March 20. Few observers are counting the KMT out just yet. It holds a narrow lead in most polls and its promise of economic growth resonates on an island recently mired in recession. But a cloud of impending doom nevertheless hangs over China's oldest political party, which Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek led into exile on Taiwan in 1949. The party's restive youth would likely abandon it should the KMT lose.
ACCESSION #
12456030

 

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