TITLE

SEEING THROUGH THE FOG OF WAR

AUTHOR(S)
Cancian, Mark F.
PUB. DATE
February 2004
SOURCE
U.S. Naval Institute Proceedings;Feb2004, Vol. 130 Issue 2, p50
SOURCE TYPE
Conference Proceeding
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The debate about uncertainty in war might appear academic, but the answer will drive decisions about operational concepts, force structure, equipment, and, perhaps most important, public expectations about what the United States forces can accomplish. Admiral William Owens, former vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, has made the clearest argument that the "hoary dictums" of Clausewitzian friction and the fog of war soon will be things of the past. Emerging Navy doctrine leans toward the Owens vision. "Sea Power 21" extols the capabilities of network warfare, though it does not quite claim that naval forces will see and strike everything.
ACCESSION #
12286029

 

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