TITLE

What the Radio Act of 1927 Provides

PUB. DATE
October 1928
SOURCE
Congressional Digest;Oct28, Vol. 7 Issue 10, p258
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article provides a summary of the law which control all radio activities in the United States. The principal provisions of the Radio Act of 1927 are discussed in detail. According to Section 1 of the radio act of 1927, the act is intended to regulate all forms of interstate and foreign radio transmissions and communications within the United States, its territories and possession. Section 2 divides the United States into five zones. The article goes ahead to describe the various other sections under the act.
ACCESSION #
12283824

Tags: RADIO -- Law & legislation;  RADIO broadcasting policy;  WIRELESS communication systems;  RADIO broadcasting -- United States;  RADIO -- History

 

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