TITLE

Steps to Transdisciplinary Sustainability Research

AUTHOR(S)
Tanner, Carmen
PUB. DATE
December 2003
SOURCE
Human Ecology Review;Winter2003, Vol. 10 Issue 2, p180
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses the steps to transdisciplinary sustainability research in conservation psychology studies. Potential influence of psychology; Collaboration between various scientists and practitioners; Development of a common perspective.
ACCESSION #
12274716

 

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