TITLE

Formal Propriety as Rhetorical Norm

AUTHOR(S)
Manolescu, Beth Innocent
PUB. DATE
February 2004
SOURCE
Argumentation;2004, Vol. 18 Issue 1, p113
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Given the persistent conception of rhetoric as effective persuasion by any means for individual success, it is desirable to describe an alternative standard for evaluating argumentation from a rhetorical perspective. I submit formal propriety as a key norm. Conceiving of form as a process of expectation and fulfillment offers a method of reconstructing argumentation that is both descriptive and normative. I illustrate the method by critiquing a sample of argumentation, and conclude by addressing the strengths and limitations of this analytical approach.
ACCESSION #
12233292

 

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