TITLE

LETTER FROM MANILA

AUTHOR(S)
Bain, David Haward
PUB. DATE
May 1986
SOURCE
Columbia Journalism Review;May/Jun86, Vol. 25 Issue 1, p27
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Relates how the press helped remove from power the tyrant Ferdinand E. Marcos in the Philippines. Snap elections in January 1986 in which Corazon Aquino competed against Marcos for the presidency; Observations regarding the crony press in the Philippines; Role of the alternative press; Observations regarding manipulations of institutions and the corruption foised upon those too helpless resist; Sudden departure of Marcos after his soldiers disobeyed his orders to kill other Filipino soldiers. INSET: Open season on journalists..
ACCESSION #
12220693

 

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