TITLE

Sales people spend just seven percent of their time – selling

PUB. DATE
August 2002
SOURCE
Management Services;Aug2002, Vol. 46 Issue 8, p7
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The effectiveness of British firms has been called into question after an international survey of efficiency/productivity revealed that sales people spend just seven percent of their time actively selling. This is just one of the surprising results revealed in "Lost Time - the global productivity study" from Proudfoot Consulting. It was found that sales staff are frequently bogged down by unproductive activities such as administration and traveling, which account for 26 percent and 28 percent, respectively.
ACCESSION #
12144995

 

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