TITLE

37% mortality rate from SARS in critically ill patients at 28 days in Singapore

PUB. DATE
January 2004
SOURCE
ACP Journal Club;Jan/Feb2004, Vol. 140 Issue 1, p21
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article focuses on a study regarding acute respiratory distress syndrome in critically ill patients with SARS, published in the 2003 issue of "Journal of the American Medical Association." 46 critically ill patients of 199 patients admitted to a hospital in Singapore with probable SARS were examined for this study. Patients were critically ill if they were transferred to the intensive care unit because of signs and symptoms of respiratory failure, arterial oxygen saturation, or if they were transferred with acute respiratory failure from another hospital and had a contact history that was suspicious of SARS. Patients' clinical course was classified as early recovery, intermediate recovery or late survival. In critically ill patients with SARS, 28-day mortality was 37%.
ACCESSION #
12104562

 

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