TITLE

34% mortality rate from SARS in critically ill patients at 28 days in Toronto

PUB. DATE
January 2004
SOURCE
ACP Journal Club;Jan/Feb2004, Vol. 140 Issue 1, p20
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article focuses on a study regarding critically ill patients with SARS, published in the 2003 issue of "Journal of the American Medical Association." The study was conducted at intensive care units of 13 hospitals in Toronto, Ontario. Suspected SARS was defined by the presence of fever, respiratory symptoms, and history of travel to a location associated with SARS transmission or close contact with a known SARS patient. The study concluded that in critically ill patients with SARS, 28-day mortality was 34%. Intensive care unit transmission of SARS to health care workers led to substantial bed closures and health care worker quarantine.
ACCESSION #
12104560

 

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