TITLE

Diabetes and other comorbid conditions were associated with a poor outcome in SARS: COMMENTARY

AUTHOR(S)
Dodek, Peter
PUB. DATE
January 2004
SOURCE
ACP Journal Club;Jan/Feb2004, Vol. 140 Issue 1, p19
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article presents the author's comments on a study regarding clinical features and short-term outcomes of patients with SARS in Toronto, Ontario, published in the 2003 issue of "Journal of the American Medical Association." The author compares this study with another study regarding SARS epidemic in Hong Kong. In the author's opinion, regression analyses in both studies are limited by the relatively small number of patients who had a poor outcome. Neither study compared the incidence and prevalence of various clinical and laboratory findings to those in patients who were admitted to the hospital because of other atypical types of pneumonia. Furthermore, neither study used a severity of illness score to compare actual with predicted hospital mortality for those patients who were admitted to the intensive care unit. Studies among nonhospitalized patients and comparisons with other patients at risk will help to distinguish this syndrome from similar conditions and to guide specific therapy.
ACCESSION #
12104559

 

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