TITLE

An intervention to treat depression and increase social support did not prolong event-free survival coronary heart disease: COMMENTARY

AUTHOR(S)
Little, D'Arcy
PUB. DATE
January 2004
SOURCE
ACP Journal Club;Jan/Feb2004, Vol. 140 Issue 1, p8
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article focuses on a study regarding effects of treating depression and low perceived social support (LPSS) on clinical events after myocardial infarction (MI), published in the 2003 issue of "Journal of the American Medical Association." Depression and LPSS are risk factors for morbidity and mortality in patients with coronary heart disease. Although it has been shown that antidepressant treatment is effective in treating the symptoms of recurrent depression after acute MI or unstable angina, no trial has shown that treating depression with counseling or antidepressants after acute MI improves mortality or recurrent MI risk. The author says that the study does not provide a survival benefit that could be seen during the time frame of the study.
ACCESSION #
12104537

 

Related Articles

  • Depression follows Myocardial Infarction. Batta, Anil Kumar // International Journal of Biological & Medical Research;Apr2014, Vol. 5 Issue 1, p3893 

    Unfortunately, depression is now a well documented independent risk factor of coronary artery disease. Post-myocardial infarction (MI) patients with a clinician-diagnosed depressive disorder or self-reported depressive symptoms carry a 2.0- to 2.5-fold increased relative risk of new...

  • An intervention to treat depression and increase social support did not prolong event-free survival in coronary heart disease.  // ACP Journal Club;Jan/Feb2004, Vol. 140 Issue 1, p8 

    This article focuses on a study regarding effects of treating depression and low perceived social support on clinical events after myocardial infarction, published in the 2003 issue of "Journal of the American Medical Association." Patients were allocated to a cognitive behavior therapy-based...

  • Identify and Treat Depression for Reduced Cardiac Risk and Improved Outcomes. Coulter, Stephanie A.; Campos, Karla // Texas Heart Institute Journal;2012, Vol. 39 Issue 2, p231 

    The article discusses the association of depression with coronary artery disease (CAD). Data revealed that depression is three times more common than in the general community in hospitalized patients who have experienced acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Longitudinal studies also showed that...

  • DEPRESSION AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE. Tancer, Manuel E.; Amirsadri, Alireza // Ethnicity & Disease;Summer2007 Supplement 3, Vol. 17, pS331 

    The article explores research studies supporting the increased rate of depression in ischemic heart disease. Multiple variables at the time of a myocardial infarct is measured. The association of the use of tricydic antidepressants with the risk of myocardial infarction risk is examined. The...

  • The impact of depression on recovery and rehabilitation following STEMI. Martin, Fiona // British Journal of Cardiac Nursing;Feb2010, Vol. 5 Issue 2, p58 

    The risk of major depression is significantly increased following the diagnosis of coronary heart disease and it remains high. Depression can have a major impact on the rehabilitation and recovery process after a myocardial infarction-a depressed person may not have the motivation to meet the...

  • Antidepressive Therapie bei koronarer Herzkrankheit. Lange-Asschenfeldt, C.; Lederbogen, F. // Der Nervenarzt;May2011, Vol. 82 Issue 5, p657 

    Depression is considered an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD) and other vascular conditions. Moreover, comorbid depressive disorder in CAD patients carries an increased risk of cardiac events and mortality. Among survivors of acute myocardial infarction, up to 20% meet...

  • Commentary: broken hearts and minds--depression and incident heart disease and stroke. Macleod, John // International Journal of Epidemiology;Aug2010, Vol. 39 Issue 4, p1025 

    The author discusses a study on the association of depression with an increased risk of both stroke and heart attack. It is noted that a group was observed for both coronary heart disease (CHD) and cerebrovascular disease (CBVD), measuring depression exposure only at baseline and using...

  • Depressive Symptoms Are Associated with Mental Stress-Induced Myocardial Ischemia after Acute Myocardial Infarction. Wei, Jingkai; Pimple, Pratik; Shah, Amit J.; Rooks, Cherie; Bremner, J. Douglas; Nye, Jonathon A.; Ibeanu, Ijeoma; Murrah, Nancy; Shallenberger, Lucy; Raggi, Paolo; Vaccarino, Viola // PLoS ONE;Jul2014, Vol. 9 Issue 7, p1 

    Objectives: Depression is an adverse prognostic factor after an acute myocardial infarction (MI), and an increased propensity toward emotionally-driven myocardial ischemia may play a role. We aimed to examine the association between depressive symptoms and mental stress-induced myocardial...

  • Non-pharmacological management of depression. Linden, Belinda // British Journal of Cardiac Nursing;Mar2011, Vol. 6 Issue 3, p142 

    The article focuses on Scottish Intercollegiate Guideline Network (SIGN) clinical guideline. It states that a number of herbs and nutritional supplements have been covered by SIGN clinical guideline, which also presents evidences for the efficiency of non-pharmaceutical therapies including...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics