TITLE

An intervention to treat depression and increase social support did not prolong event-free survival in coronary heart disease

PUB. DATE
January 2004
SOURCE
ACP Journal Club;Jan/Feb2004, Vol. 140 Issue 1, p8
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article focuses on a study regarding effects of treating depression and low perceived social support on clinical events after myocardial infarction, published in the 2003 issue of "Journal of the American Medical Association." Patients were allocated to a cognitive behavior therapy-based intervention. The study concluded that in patients with recent myocardial infarction (MI) who were depressed or had low perceived social support, cognitive behavior therapy plus antidepressant drugs did not reduce recurrent MI and death.
ACCESSION #
12104536

 

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