TITLE

Review: Comprehensive occupational therapy interventions improve outcomes after stroke: COMMENTARY

AUTHOR(S)
Langhorne, Peter
PUB. DATE
January 2004
SOURCE
ACP Journal Club;Jan/Feb2004, Vol. 140 Issue 1, p7
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article focuses on a study regarding occupational therapy (OT) for stroke patients, published in the 2003 issue of the journal "Stroke." OT is a well-established component of stroke rehabilitation but has only recently been tested in high-quality randomized controlled trials. The main message for clinicians is that OT can improve outcomes. Intervention by a skilled occupational therapist to address specific poststroke problems can improve patient activity and social participation. This clearly is important and reinforces the need for OT input in a stroke rehabilitation service. Future OT research should focus on identifying discrete, effective interventions that occupational therapists can provide.
ACCESSION #
12104535

 

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