TITLE

Carotid Doppler microembolic signals in patients one year after heart valve surgery

AUTHOR(S)
Dalinin, Vadim; Lingaas, Per Snorre; Hatteland, Kjell; Svennevig, Jan L.
PUB. DATE
November 2003
SOURCE
Perfusion;Nov2003, Vol. 18 Issue 6, p333
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Doppler ultrasound has been used to detect microemboli during and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). The aim of the present study was to examine the frequency of microembolic signals (MES) in patients one year after heart valve replacement, to look for possible risk factors associated with MES and for any correlation with cerebral events. One hundred patients, 69 male and 31 female, mean age 66.3 ± 12.4 years, were examined one year after heart valve replacement. Thirty patients, 61% male and 39% female, mean age 62.5 ± 8.7 years, who had undergone cardiovascular operations without heart valve pathology served as controls. A newly developed microemboli detector, EMEX-25 (Hatteland Instrumentering, Norway) was used to detect MES from both carotid arteries. MES were detected in 61% of the valve patients. A correlation was found between the number of MES, previous cardiovascular operations, emergency surgery and EuroSCORE (p < 0.05). There was no correlation between the number of MES and the level of anticoagulation expressed as international normalization ratio (INR), atrial fibrillation, serum-cholesterol, New York heart association (NYHA) class, gender, age, valve type or valve position. The average number of MES was not increased in seven patients who had experienced major (three) or minor (transient, four) cerebral events during follow-up. In the 30 nonvalve controls, MES were detected in 46% of the patients. MES were detected in valve patients as well as in nonvalve patients one year after surgery. In valve patients, a significant correlation was found between MES and previous surgery, emergency surgery and EuroSCORE. There was no correlation between the number of MES and INR level or postoperative cerebral events.
ACCESSION #
12087819

 

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