TITLE

Pear pressure

AUTHOR(S)
Kinsley, Michael
PUB. DATE
November 1993
SOURCE
New Republic;11/22/93, Vol. 209 Issue 21, p6
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the policy of U.S. President Bill Clinton's administration towards health care. Increase in medical care costs and insurance due to economic factors; Challenges confronting the Clinton administration in implementing social reform initiatives; Health care reform and implications for the president's political leadership; American Medical Association's objection to a bias towards managed care; Compromise on healthcare.
ACCESSION #
12082436

 

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