TITLE

Opportunity knocks

PUB. DATE
January 2004
SOURCE
New Scientist;1/10/2004, Vol. 181 Issue 2429, p5
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Mixed emotions greeted the signals, or lack of them, emanating this week from Mars. While British space scientists mourned the almost certain passing of Beagle 2 and the European Space Agency toasted the partial success of its Mars Express mission, rejoicing at U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was unconfined. The landing of its rover, Spirit, has been a dream come true — and something the beleaguered agency desperately needed. NASA is still reeling from the criticisms of the Columbia accident investigation board, its remaining three shuttles are still grounded, and even its crown-jewel space station seems to have sprung a leak. This week's achievement, however, comes from robotic exploration, which has been the source of some of NASA's most dramatic and cost-effective missions.
ACCESSION #
12007345

 

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