TITLE

Contrarian Thoughts About Older Workers

AUTHOR(S)
Goldberg, Beverly
PUB. DATE
January 2002
SOURCE
Financial Executive;Jan/Feb2002, Vol. 18 Issue 1, p28
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article emphasizes the importance to corporate chief financial officers of going beyond stereotypes about older workers to determine the true costs and benefits of an aging work force. By aggregating key data by age group, surprising results could emerge. For instance, companies typically direct training towards younger workers. Attentive firms may find, though, that older workers change employers less frequently and may represent a better investment of training dollars. A similar situation may exist with health care. Survey data indicate older workers take fewer days off for minor illnesses than younger ones.
ACCESSION #
11910452

 

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