TITLE

Relationship between dyslipidemia and vascular repair after cervical artery dissection

AUTHOR(S)
Yamada, Shuichi; Ohnishi, Hideyuki; Kuga, Yoshihiro; Kodama, Yuji; Hayashi, Masato; Takahashi, Kenkichi; Takamura, Yoshiaki; Nakase, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Ichiro
PUB. DATE
September 2016
SOURCE
Neurology & Clinical Neuroscience;Sep2016, Vol. 4 Issue 5, p176
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Background In some cases of cervical artery dissection, vascular repair subsequently occurs at the stenotic or occluded sites. The factors responsible for this type of vascular repair remain unknown, but some reports from in vitro and animal models suggest that it is related to lipid metabolism. Aim In the present study, we investigated the relationship between vascular repair and dyslipidemia in cervical artery dissection. Methods Patients with internal carotid artery and vertebral artery dissection who were admitted between April 2012 and March 2015 were included. Vascular repair was evaluated using magnetic resonance angiography. All patients were treated conservatively using antihypertensive and antiplatelet drugs, and also with statins in the presence of dyslipidemia. In this study, we investigated the relationship between vascular repair and dyslipidemia in cervical artery dissection. Results Vascular repair was observed in 34 out of 55 patients (61.8%, repair group). Total cholesterol (203 mg/dL in repair group vs 225 mg/dL in non-repair group), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (119 mg/dL vs 140 mg/dL), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio (2.09 vs 2.74) and triglycerides (117 mg/dL vs 154 mg/dL) were significantly negatively correlated with vascular repair. However, statin use was not significantly related to this type of repair. Conclusions We showed a relationship between vascular repair after cervical artery dissection and dyslipidemia. As cervical artery dissection often occurs at a relatively young age, vascular repair and the management of dyslipidemia are important issues to consider for the prevention of arteriosclerotic cerebrovascular diseases in later life.
ACCESSION #
118056601

 

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