TITLE

Untitled

AUTHOR(S)
Clark, David
PUB. DATE
September 2016
SOURCE
Farmers Weekly;9/9/2016, Issue 1133, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article provides information on a farmer David Clark who runs an irrigated farm in Canterbury Plains of New Zealand. Topics discussed include availability of forage and vegetable seed crops, kale and oat crops as feed for lambs, cropping area covered for grass seed production, and winter crop cultivation.
ACCESSION #
118038367

 

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