TITLE

The Opium King

AUTHOR(S)
Hutt, David
PUB. DATE
September 2016
SOURCE
History Today;Sep2016, Vol. 66 Issue 9, p39
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article profiles Khun Sa, a Burmese drug lord. Topics discussed include his offer to the U.S. government to buy his entire opium supply if it wants to stop heroin from entering the country's borders, his indictment for drug trafficking, born on February 17, 1934 in the northern Shan state of Burma and fighting for the Kuomintang from a young age.
ACCESSION #
118031303

 

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