TITLE

Saproxylic moths reveal complex within-group and group-environment patterns

AUTHOR(S)
Jaworski, Tomasz; Plewa, Radosław; Hilszczański, Jacek; Szczepkowski, Andrzej; Horak, Jakub
PUB. DATE
August 2016
SOURCE
Journal of Insect Conservation;Aug2016, Vol. 20 Issue 4, p677
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
We investigated saproxylic moths of the family Tineidae, a neglected group inhabiting wood-decaying fungi and dead wood, within the Białowieża Primeval Forest in Poland. Study data were obtained from the collection of 280 fruiting bodies of wood-decaying fungi and the subsequent rearing of adults. Spatial and statistical distribution of saproxylic moths, relationship among species and the influence of environment reflected by interaction with tree and fungal species together with tree and stand level characteristics were studied. Fifteen species and 533 individuals of saproxylic moths were reared. The fungal species, number of fruiting bodies and standing position of a tree influenced species richness. Moth abundance was influenced by fungal species, coniferous trees, increasing tree diameter, number of fruiting bodies and brown rot. Moth abundance was also enhanced by standing dead trees located in managed forests with higher canopy closure. Analyses indicate that several moth species favor a particular rot type and that some fungi host a richer fauna than others. Furthermore, our results indicate mutually independent fungal colonization events by saproxylic moth species, and thus a possible mechanism exists for competition avoidance with other saproxylic moths. Saproxylic moths revealed complex within-group patterns that responded differently to environmental variables. Thus, potential conservation of these organisms requires various approaches including ecosystem management, especially in the context of addressing their diverse habitat requirements.
ACCESSION #
118028778

 

Related Articles

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics