TITLE

Army offers ranks e-learning option

PUB. DATE
December 2003
SOURCE
IT Training;Dec2003/Jan2004, p8
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
British Army personnel will be the first students to take foundation degrees in business and management with Great Britain eUniversities Worldwide. The government-backed company was formed to provide degree courses online from Great Britain universities to students and businesses worldwide. The army students, ranging in rank from lance corporal to major, will be the first to be sponsored by the British Army to gain qualifications via e-learning. The three-year, online, part-time degree is being offered by Bournemouth and Leeds Metropolitan Universities in England.
ACCESSION #
11781632

 

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