TITLE

AN ADOLESCENT PERSPECTIVE ON SEXUAL HEALTH EDUCATION AT SCHOOL AND AT HOME: II. MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS

AUTHOR(S)
Byers, E. Sandra; Sears, Heather A.; Voyer, Susan D.; Thurlow, Jennifer L.; Cohen, Jacqueline N.; Weaver, Angela D.
PUB. DATE
March 2003
SOURCE
Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality;2003, Vol. 12 Issue 1, p19
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Attitudes toward and experiences with sexual health education (SHE) at school and at home were assessed in a sample of 745 middle school students enrolled in grades 6-8 in New Brunswick. Students were in favour of SHE at school (93%), and the majority (69%) agreed that schools and parents should share this responsibility. Almost all students thought that SHE should start in middle school or sooner. Less than one half of the students who had received SHE agreed that the topics in which they were most interested had been covered. They also highlighted a need for more factual information and for practical skills associated with a variety of sexual health topics. Most students were positive about their most recent sexual health teacher. However, less than one half of youths were positive about the SHE they had received at home. Gender and grade level analyses indicated that, overall, these results apply to girls and boys, and to students across the middle school years.
ACCESSION #
11751130

 

Related Articles

  • Sex education initiates meaningful discussion. Singleton, Carol // Nursing Standard;3/12/2008, Vol. 22 Issue 27, p28 

    The author reflects on the importance of teaching sex education in schools. She stresses that it should be compulsory for school to introduce sex education to its students to be able to discuss the issues with their peers, including different types of contraception and the diseases that can be...

  • It cannot be taught as a 'bare bones' exercise. Gayle, Elsie // Nursing Standard;3/12/2008, Vol. 22 Issue 27, p28 

    The author reflects on the significance of requiring schools to teach sex education. She asserts that teaching sex education will make a difference to irresponsible teenage pregnancies. She also stresses that sex education should be taught as a component of relationships. Furthermore, she states...

  • School nurses should play a leading role. Pellett, Candice // Nursing Standard;3/12/2008, Vol. 22 Issue 27, p29 

    The author reflects on the significance of including sex education in the school curriculum to limit teenage pregnancy. She asserts that sex education in school should also be delivered by the right people, ideally, a full-time nurse in school, who could emphasise the link between sexual health...

  • REAL Act will provide sex education based on public health needs, not rightwing ideology.  // Empty Closet;Apr2007, Issue 400, p14A 

    The article discusses the Responsible Education About Life (REAL) Act which was praised by the Human Rights Campaign. The bill will facilitate a grant program for comprehensive and age-appropriate sex education through the U.S. Department of Health. With the REAL Act, it is expected that states...

  • AN ADOLESCENT PERSPECTIVE ON SEXUAL HEALTH EDUCATION AT SCHOOL AND AT HOME: I. HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS. Byers, E. Sandra; Sears, Heather A.; Voyer, Susan D.; Thurlow, Jennifer L.; Cohen, Jacqueline N.; Weaver, Angela D. // Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality;2003, Vol. 12 Issue 1, p1 

    In this study, we assessed high school students' attitudes toward and experiences with sexual health education (SHE) at school and at home. The participants were 1663 youths enrolled in Grades 9-12 in New Brunswick. Almost all students were in favour of SHE at school (92%). The majority (77%)...

  • Abstinence education. Zeiler, Alean // Linacre Quarterly;Nov2014, Vol. 81 Issue 4, p372 

    The American College of Pediatricians strongly endorses abstinence-until-marriage sex education and recommends adoption by all school systems in lieu of 'comprehensive sex education.' This position is based on 'the public health principle of primary prevention-risk avoidance in lieu of risk...

  • BLACKBOARD Jungle. Glasscock, Jessica // Print;Jul/Aug2004, Vol. 58 Issue 4, p76 

    Presents an article on ways to present sex education to adolescents. Aims of the sex education; Historical background of sex education; Information on several tools for sex education.

  • JUST DON'T DO IT! Kelly, Katy // U.S. News & World Report;10/17/2005, Vol. 139 Issue 14, p44 

    Offers a discussion about whether children are learning too much or not enough about sex. Emphasis of some schools on abstinence-only sexual education programs; Reference to the book "Sex & Sensibility: The Thinking Parent's Guide," by Deborah Roffman; Variations in sexuality education...

  • Parent-Adolescent Sexual Communication: Will it Always be Unconventional? Coffelt, Tina // Conference Papers -- National Communication Association;2008, p1 

    Parent-adolescent sexual communication (PASC) has received considerable attention from researchers for at least 30 years. This research has been useful to describe the content, extent, and timing of conversations parents have with their adolescents. However, much of this research has been...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics