TITLE

SAMPLE ATTRITION IN PANEL STUDIES: A RESEARCH NOTE

AUTHOR(S)
McBroom, William H.
PUB. DATE
September 1988
SOURCE
International Review of Modern Sociology;Autumn88, Vol. 18 Issue 2, p231
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Recent evidence suggests that high rates of nonresponse in survey research do not necessarily result in response bias An example is presented in which differential response patterns in a longitudinal study are shown to result in subsamples that are similar both on demographic factors and on a major variable of interest Suggestions are offered regarding the need and utility of relativistic standards for assessing response rates.
ACCESSION #
11714755

 

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