TITLE

Democracy for China: American propaganda and the may fourth movement

AUTHOR(S)
Schmidt, Hans
PUB. DATE
January 1998
SOURCE
Diplomatic History;Winter98, Vol. 22 Issue 1, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on a worldwide propaganda campaign conducted by the United States government during the closing stages of World War I and promotes America as the trustworthy champion of democracy. Why did the propaganda effort remain well known; Indepth look at the potency and destabilizing impact of propaganda.
ACCESSION #
115634

 

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