TITLE

A BIOSOCIOLOGICAL APPROACH TO HUMANISM

AUTHOR(S)
Elmer, Glaister
PUB. DATE
February 1980
SOURCE
Humanity & Society;Feb80, Vol. 4 Issue 1, p70
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
There terms "biological revolution" and "knowledge explosion" have been applied to the astonishingly rapid development of the biological sciences in recent decades. The new field of bio-sociology attempts to integrate all relevant aspects of biological discoveries with existing sociological knowledge. Sociologists and even humanist sociologists have sometimes greeted this attempt with indifferences or hostility. Such attitudes often appear to be based upon lack of knowledge or misconceptions about the scope and goals of biosociology. A cautious acceptance of the biological nature of man will give sociology a credibility and wholeness impossible to achieve through continued use of an "over-socialized" conception of human beings. The discussion is illustrative rather than exhaustive. Biobehavioral research is ongoing in many other areas including the prenatal environment, body rhythms, the birth process, and the behavioral effects of exercise, nutrition and environmental pollutants.
ACCESSION #
11540497

 

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