TITLE

A life insurance medical, 1848

AUTHOR(S)
Caplan, Joseph
PUB. DATE
December 2003
SOURCE
CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal;12/9/2003, Vol. 169 Issue 12, p1331
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reveals the medical practice in rural Canada in 1848 through a medical insurance questionnaire from Canada Life Insurance Co. Life hazards depicted in the questionnaire; Owner of the insurance; Physician-patient relationship depicted in the questionnaire.
ACCESSION #
11528701

 

Related Articles

  • Shared medical appointments offer chronic care forums. Brower, Amanda // Managed Healthcare Executive;Mar2010, Vol. 20 Issue 3, p23 

    The article reports on shared medical appointments (SMA) that offers chronic care forums in the U.S. It states that many providers have adopted the SMA model because they believe that it improves accessibility and efficiency of healthcare. SMA is a physician to patient visit in which the...

  • Medical Economics. Cohen, Greg; Kornfeld, Bob; McClanahan, Ray // Podiatry Management;Nov/Dec2009, Vol. 28 Issue 9, p28 

    A letter to the editor is presented about the limited knowledge of patients on the economics of practicing medicine, as well as two responses to the letter.

  • PRACTICE MANAGEMENT Q&As. O'Brien, Liz // Medical Economics; 

    The article presents a question and answer advisory related to practice management. When a patient is injured because of medical malpractice, the answer depends on the contract language of the physician's general office insurer and the patient's health insurer. In charging for house calls to...

  • The Electronic Medical Record and the Oath of Hippocrates. Carlon, Graziano C. // Health Management Technology;May2000, Vol. 21 Issue 5, p16 

    Deals with implications of the changes in the practice of medicine in the United States. Advent of managed care; Impact of the changes on the relationship between physician and patient; Information on the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act; Factors that influence the diffusion...

  • The components of consultation. Taylor, David C.; Moses, Karin W. // Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine;Feb2003, Vol. 96 Issue 2, p83 

    The article discusses the components of medical consultation. The fee will be met from private funds, and the practitioner assumes that the patient can afford it or will perhaps modify it according to ability to pay. Since most people cannot pay for medical care out of current funds, some sort...

  • How green does the grass grow in hospital-owned practices? Gans, David N. // MGMA Connexion;May/Jun2006, Vol. 6 Issue 5, p16 

    The article focuses on the disadvantages for physicians practicing in hospital-owned medical groups in the U.S. As compared to their counterparts in private practice, hospital-owned physicians generate less income. Physicians in hospital-owned practices exercise no control over their patient...

  • Measuring physician contribution to the healthcare safety net. Metzger, Lawrence M.; Andes, Steven; Gans, David N.; Margolis, James W. // Business Horizons;Mar2010, Vol. 53 Issue 2, p199 

    Abstract: There are an estimated 46 million Americans without health insurance and an even larger number for whom health insurance does not cover all needed medical services. These individuals and families have to rely more and more on government programs and physicians’ willingness to...

  • You Don't Have to Be Smarter, Just Give Better Care. Goldman, Erik // Holistic Primary Care;Spring2015, Vol. 16 Issue 1, p11 

    The article presents advice for success in holistic and functional medicine in the U.S. which include the promotion of Health Savings Accounts (HSAs), the concept of speaking less and listening more, and the need for good ancillary services such as HeartMath, Bioidentical Hormones, and Body...

  • Discussing Weight with Obese Primary Care Patients: Physician and Patient Perceptions. Greiner, K. Allen; Born, Wendi; Hall, Sandra; Qingjiang Hou; Kimminau, Kim S.; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S. // JGIM: Journal of General Internal Medicine;May2008, Vol. 23 Issue 5, p581 

    To evaluate patient–provider agreement on whether weight and related behaviors were discussed during routine visits. Post-visit survey assessments of patients and providers. Obese patients make up the majority of all patients seen in primary care (PC). The patients and physicians were...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics