TITLE

Working in Britain: Older workers and women

PUB. DATE
January 2003
SOURCE
Management Services;Jan2003, Vol. 47 Issue 1, p3
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article describes the "Working in Britain" survey of employees in Great Britain which is part of the Future of Work Programme funded by the Economic and Social Research Council. The survey showed that older workers, and women, are more critical of the conditions attached to their work and are unhappy with their working hours. Older workers were not better placed in terms of pensions than younger people. Meanwhile, middle aged workers come out as much more likely to belong to a private pension scheme of their employers than older people, which suggests that employers are not prepared to offer such schemes to older persons as an incentive to recruitment or for staying in the job.
ACCESSION #
11510794

 

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