TITLE

SEN virus infection and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma: a case-control study

AUTHOR(S)
Tangkijvanich, Pisit; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Sriponthong, Maturapod; Kullavanijaya, Pinit; Poovorawan, Yong
PUB. DATE
November 2003
SOURCE
American Journal of Gastroenterology;Nov2003, Vol. 98 Issue 11, p2500
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
: ObjectiveHepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are major risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The role of a novel DNA virus, designated SEN virus (SENV), in the etiology of liver cancer remains to be established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between SENV infection and the risk of HCC by conducting a hospital-based, case–control study among Thai patients.: MethodsEighty-six patients with HCC were enrolled and matched individually to a control according to sex, age (± 5 yr), and geographic background. The presences of HBV DNA, HCV RNA, and SENV DNA in stored serum samples were detected with the use of semi-nested polymerase chain reaction amplification.: ResultsIndividuals who were infected with SENV did not have increased risk of developing HCC (OR = 1.49, 95% CI = 0.50–4.42). In contrast, those who were positive for HBV markers (hepatitis B surface antigen and/or HBV DNA) or HCV markers (anti-HCV and/or HCV RNA) had significant risk for HCC (OR = 19.91, 95% CI = 8.26–47.98 and OR = 7.97, 95% CI = 2.15–29.54, respectively). Moreover, coinfection with SENV did not further increase the risk of HCC among patients infected with HBV and/or HCV.: ConclusionOur data suggest that, unlike chronic HBV or HCV infection, SENV infection is not a risk factor for developing HCC in Thai populations.
ACCESSION #
11469049

 

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