TITLE

CAN AMERICA MANAGE ITS SOVIET POLICY?

AUTHOR(S)
Nye, Joseph S.
PUB. DATE
March 1984
SOURCE
Foreign Affairs;Spring84, Vol. 62 Issue 4, p857
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Questions whether or not the U.S. can maintain it's policy towards the Soviet Union. How the U.S. spent less on defense, foreign aid, embassies, and foreign broadcasting in 1980 then in 1960; How nuclear war has been avoided; Objectives of American policy in the postwar period; How support from U.S. allies is weakening; Facing the fact that change in the Soviet Union will occur slowly.
ACCESSION #
11404693

 

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