TITLE

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY: November12, 1815--WOMEN'S RIGHTS LEADER ELIZABETH CADY STANTON IS BORN

PUB. DATE
November 2003
SOURCE
Scholastic News -- Edition 3;11/10/2003, Vol. 60 Issue 8, p3
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Profiles U.S. citizen Elizabeth Cady Stanton and her efforts for women's rights. INSET: Synonyms.
ACCESSION #
11286856

 

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