TITLE

Role Reversal

AUTHOR(S)
Dyer, Geoff
PUB. DATE
November 2003
SOURCE
New Republic;11/10/2003, Vol. 229 Issue 19, p14
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The author reports that, as Brazil's agricultural production has expanded, the country has started lobbying aggressively for access to Western markets. Throughout the past decade, Brazil has become an agricultural superpower, the result of a little-noticed farming revolution in places like Rondonopolis. And, as it achieves superpower status, Brazil has begun using trade talks to find new markets for its increasingly productive farmers. Just like the United States has done. The savanna where Rondonopolis sits, known in Brazil as the cerrado, is a vast region roughly the size of Western Europe. As the infrastructure of the cerrado began to improve, recent immigrants to Brazil--including Japanese families--started moving to the area, eager to obtain land. They brought with them the notion that the cerrado is a place where hard work and a tough, cowboy attitude can lead to fortune--a sharp contrast to other parts of Brazil, where most of the economy is stagnating. As a result of these changes, today Brazil's interior has become a globally competitive farming engine. In the process of revamping the interior, Brazil's farmers have punctured one of the myths of modern development: that large-scale agriculture does not fare well in the tropics. In the last decade Brazil's government has concentrated on tearing down trade barriers--even its own--in order to reach consumers in wealthier countries, thereby boosting exports.
ACCESSION #
11264251

 

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