TITLE

An observation of successful bat predation by Gabar Goshawk Micronisus gabar at Ndoto Mountains, Kenya

AUTHOR(S)
Mikula, Peter; Hromada, Martin
PUB. DATE
July 2015
SOURCE
Scopus;Jul2015, Vol. 35, p51
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the observation of the hunting behavior of Gabar goshawk (Micronisus gabar) on February 3, 2015 in Ndoto Mountains, Kenya. Topics covered include account of the goshawk's predation of a small unidentified bat and normal diet of the Gabar goshawk which consists of lizards, mammalian prey and middle-sized birds.
ACCESSION #
112243726

 

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