TITLE

ACHIEVING THE WAY: CONFUCIAN VIRTUE POLITICS AND THE PROBLEM OF DIRTY HANDS

AUTHOR(S)
Sungmoon Kim
PUB. DATE
January 2016
SOURCE
Philosophy East & West;Jan2016, Vol. 66 Issue 1, p152
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article examines cases of virtue politics in early Confucianism. Topics covered include the argument against the claim that the dirty hands problem is a generic problems in politics across different cultures, the failure of political theorist Michael Walzer to consider the role of absolutism in the political community and the preclusion of the dirty hands problems in the ethical tradition of Confucianism.
ACCESSION #
112223164

 

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