TITLE

Dialogic Swahili Literature - Key to Harmonization in Diversity

AUTHOR(S)
KEZILAHABI, EUPHRASE
PUB. DATE
January 2015
SOURCE
Matatu: Journal for African Culture & Society;2015, Vol. 46 Issue 1, p33
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This critical scrutiny of the linguistic contact zone in East Africa takes its cue from longstanding efforts to promote Swahili and other African languages as institutionalized means of communication and a medium of contemporary African literatures. Because power-relations in and outside the contact zone often favour English, a conscious effort has to be made to strengthen Swahili as a regional linguistic and literary alternative capable of expressing indigenous knowledge-systems and as the essential inter-ethnic and cross-border language for constructing postcolonial identities. Having successfully broken free of traditionalist constraints, especially in poetry, Swahili literature will expand its role of transgressing cultural borders in East Africa. Dialogic Swahili literature is the key to harmonization in diversity in East Africa, particularly Tanzania and Kenya, as it has created inter-cultural and inter-class dialogue. Beyond the region, it is poised to become a powerful medium of resistance that will counter-penetrate the global and make its presence felt. What is needed is a reconciliation between former European languages and African languages in the 'nuclear' contact zones constituted by African language communities.
ACCESSION #
112202747

 

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