TITLE

CUTTING EDGE

PUB. DATE
October 2003
SOURCE
New Scientist;10/11/2003, Vol. 180 Issue 2416, p22
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Minuscule quantities of drugs can now be mixed cleanly and efficiently using optical tweezers and an optical scalpel. Researchers from the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, Maryland, took giant "liposomes" — hollow cell-like structures about 10 micrometers wide made of phosphorus-rich fatty acids called phospholipids — and filled them with chemicals dissolved in water. They then pushed two such cells together using a pair of infrared lasers. Finally, these cells were fused using a single pulse of ultraviolet laser light. The laser fused the cell membranes at their point of contact and created a hole through which the chemicals in each could mix and react.
ACCESSION #
11154283

 

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