TITLE

Vietnamese sex workers convicted of illegal immigration

PUB. DATE
September 2002
SOURCE
Contemporary Sexuality;Sep2002, Vol. 36 Issue 9, p8
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article discusses the conviction of Vietnamese sex workers under illegal immigration. Of the estimated 20,000 child prostitutes working in Cambodia, many are from neighboring Vietnam. Sold by their families for about $200 or kidnapped by traffickers,
ACCESSION #
11142653

 

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