TITLE

Economic Fluctuations and Growth

PUB. DATE
September 2003
SOURCE
NBER Reporter;Fall2003, p32
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents the issues discussed at the U.S. National Bureau of Economic Research's Program for Economic Fluctuations and Growth held in Cambridge, Massachusetts on July 19, 2003. Introduction of a tractable structural model of subjective beliefs; Examination on the asset pricing implications of a parsimonious two-agent macroeconomic model with two key features; Development of a new model of wage friction.
ACCESSION #
11122023

 

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