TITLE

Safe as e-houses

PUB. DATE
April 2003
SOURCE
Management Services;Apr2003, Vol. 47 Issue 4, p22
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The paper assesses the move that was taken by Microsoft Corp. in making personal computers a lot more secure. Although passwords are a cheap and convenient way to authenticate computer users, there are some fundamental problems with the concept as a whole. Passwords must be changed regularly and should never be written down. But they also need to be long and complicated enough to be difficult for anyone else to guess. A hacker who gains physical access to a network server can easily retrieve encrypted versions of every user's password. Users worried about the effect on Digital Rights Management used typically to protect published material. Microsoft is combining passwords with smart cards to authenticate users and working with others in the industry to improve Internet protocols to stop email that could propagate misleading information or malicious code that falsely appears to be from trusted senders. The company also made changes to Outlook to block email attachments associated with unsafe files, prevent access to a user's address book and give administrators the ability to manage email security settings for their organization. Even information traveling between a user's keyboard and monitor will be protected by the hardware architecture.
ACCESSION #
11115967

 

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