TITLE

Tit for Tat

PUB. DATE
July 1978
SOURCE
New Republic;7/8/78-7/15/78, Vol. 179 Issue 2/3, p8
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the tit for tat situation between the United States and the Soviet Union. Statement of U.S. President Jimmy Carter about the stability of the relationship between the two countries; Russian leader Leonid Brezhnev's desire for peace and better friendship between the two nations; Release of Soviet spies and an American businessman accused in Moscow of currency law violations, to their respective ambassadors; American reporters ordered to stand trial on civil charges against the Soviet government television system.
ACCESSION #
11106488

 

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