TITLE

Subjects and Objects in Modern Corrections

AUTHOR(S)
Duguid, Stephen
PUB. DATE
June 2000
SOURCE
Journal of Correctional Education;Jun2000, Vol. 51 Issue 2, p241
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Note: A version of this paper was given at the Alberta Correctional Education Association conference in Banff, Alberta in 1999 and is expanded upon in my forthcoming "Can Prisoners Work? The Prisoner as Object and Subject in Modern Corrections (University of Toronto Press, 2000). In this paper I am going to focus on the issue of the prisoner as on the one hand an object and on the other as a subject. This approach has been influenced by my work over the past several years in the are of environmental issues, in particular my focus on the way we humans have come to think about the natural world. One of the central accusations made by environmentalists and ecologists is that in the modern, Western industrial world we have adopted a subject/object differentiation in dealing with nature-we are subjects and the rest of creation are objects-the classic "I" vs. "it" way of seeing. This has led to two versions of how we should proceed in dealing with the various crises and malfunctions we find in our relationship with nature: 1) We can "master" the crisis-in this case global warming, climate change, loss of biodiversity, resource depletion etc.-through the use of technology, conservation and common sense. We can "fix the problem" and the "problem" is it, not us. 2)Deep ecologists argue on the other hand that it is the "mastery agenda" itself that undermines any possibility of solving these kinds of problems and to move forward we must establish a more reciprocal relationship with the natural world.
ACCESSION #
11097021

 

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